Archive for the ‘Natural Stages of Growth in Writing’ Category

Faltering Ownership Basics

Faltering Ownership

What is the Faltering Ownership stage of writing?

The stop and start stage of writing. Students show bursts of growth, pencil management, keyboarding skills, some spelling triumphs mixed with obvious errors, variable punctuation, moments of brilliance, and paragraphs of insipidity. Pride in successful writing experiences alternate with struggle.

How do I know if my child is in Faltering Ownership stage?

Your child:

  • tires quickly, but can get some writing to the page without help from the parent.
  • takes pride in his work and wants to improve it or share it.
  • doesn’t retain correct spellings even after “learning” them.
  • needs support, shows some independence, but also resists input from parent-editor.

In other words, one day your child gets a detailed story to paper. The next week, she complains that she hates writing. This is often seen in eleven and twelve year olds but don’t be governed by age range. Focus instead on the description and match it to your individual child.

I think my child is in the Faltering Ownership stage. Now what?

1) Listen to the Faltering Ownership podcast.

2) See Faltering Ownership in action

Word Tickets
Wild Words

3) Check out how other homeschoolers implement the Brave Writer program

Look We’re Learning
Life on a Canadian Island

4) Consider Brave Writer products and online classes for additional help such as our Faltering Ownership Home Study Course:

Faltering_Ownership_Natural_StagesA Year-Long Language Arts Plan!
11-12 year olds (age range is approximate)

Developmentally appropriate projects.
Step-by-step instructions.
A weekly and monthly plan.

The Writer’s Jungle provides you with the essential tools that enable you to be an effective writing coach. Faltering Ownership is the product that gives you a practical routine (think, schedule ala Brave Writer).

Download a FREE sample on our product page.

Partnership Writing Primer

Partnership Writing Primer

What is Partnership Writing?

Partnership Writing is the most overlooked stage of writing development. It is a writing-revising-editing partnership between a young writer and a writing coach (YOU!). It’s the stage where parent and child write together, with the parent providing the much-needed support to get those precious, quirky insights to the page.

How do I know if my child is in the Partnership Writing stage?

Your child:

  • can write a sentence or a few words at a time but tires easily.
  • needs help with spelling, punctuation, and getting rich vocabulary to the page.
  • shows interest in using a pencil or keyboard but is not ready to “go it alone.”
  • needs modeling for how to take thoughts and put them in writing.

In other words, your child wants to share thoughts and ideas through writing but original writing does not reflect the mind-life or verbal fluency. This is often seen in nine and ten year olds but don’t be governed by age range. Focus instead on the description and match it to your child.

I think my child is in the Partnership Writing stage. Now what?

1) Read the blog post, “The misunderstood ‘child-led learning’ model”

2) Listen to the Partnership Writing Podcast

3) See Partnership Writing in action

Who, what, where, when, and why project
Crossword writing activity
Cinderella lap book

4) Check out Brave Writer products and online classes for additional help such as our Partnership Writing Home Study Course:

Partnership Writing productA Year-Long Language Arts Plan!
9-10 year olds (age range is approximate)

Developmentally appropriate projects.
Step-by-step instructions.
A weekly and monthly plan.

The Writer’s Jungle provides you with the essential tools that enable you to be an effective writing coach. Partnership Writing is the product that gives you a practical routine (think, schedule ala Brave Writer).

Download a FREE SAMPLE on our product page.

If your child isn’t in the Partnership Writing stage, here’s a helpful guide for all the stages.

Partnership Writing in action!

Partnership Writing 1

Who, what, where, when, and why project!

Dear Julie,

I can’t thank you enough for the wonderful products you’ve created and for your continuous support and inspiration! I have learned so much from you!

We have been meeting once a month, since September, for our Brave Writer co-op with four other families. We have four girls doing Partnership Writing and six little ones doing Jot It Down. The main purpose of our gatherings is to provide an audience for one another, but we also play games or do some fun writing activities. So far, all the kids have worked on the same projects every month (each with their own topics, styles, etc.). We’ve also discussed doing “open mic” so the kids can share any other writing they’ve been doing, but we tweak and learn as we go.

Last month our older girls worked on the 5 Ws project from Partnership Writing…who, what, where, when, and why. One of the moms thought it would be fun for them to create a newspaper using their 5 Ws projects. They all got together one afternoon with their completed projects and put together their first issue of “Brave News.” Yes, they came up with the name themselves!

Partnership Writing 2

I hope this is not their last issue.

I’ll be in touch soon with what our little ones have been up to!

Hugs!
Patty

Jotting It Down in action!

Jotting It Down Patty

Dear Julie,

I had to share this with you. My girls were having breakfast and having a nonsense conversation that was starting to wear on me. I suggested they talk about something else, like the books they’re currently reading perhaps ;-).

All on their own, they turned it into a full blown discussion with little sis narrating her story and big sis jotting it down. Big sis can get a little over zealous with her questions, but at least she’s passionate about it…gotta give her that much.

Thanks for continuing to inspire us every day!
Patty

Learn more about Jotting It Down!

Image (cc)

If your child is in the Jot It Down stage

http://www.dreamstime.com/stock-photo-boy-watching-mother-write-notes-sofa-writing-as-young-son-her-home-image31836350

Jotting down what your kids tell you isn’t a short cut to writing.
It IS writing.

~from The Writer’s Jungle

Does your child excitedly share stories and experiences but is blocked when she tries to write them down? Does his writing not reflect his sophisticated vocabulary? Does she refuse to pen more than a word or two? Does he struggle with handwriting or spelling?

If you answered yes to any of these then your child may be in the Jot It Down stage.

Kids in that stage are often between the ages of five and eight, but age doesn’t matter so much. What matters is where they are in the Natural Stages of Growth.

If your child is in the Jot It Down stage

Forget all the scopes and sequences.

Focus on love, joy, and self-expression.

Read books together.

Watch movies together.

Have big, juicy conversations.

Play with words.

Catch your child in the act of thinking or storytelling and write down what he says.

Let her dictate with you acting as secretary.

With your child’s permission, share some of his thoughts and stories with family and friends.

This is how you slowly help your child see the value of putting thoughts into writing.

So, each time something happy happens, jot it down. Pay attention to your kids—as in, pay attention to their happiness quota. Play games, have tea, laugh at jokes, record the clever things your child says, have her write one beautiful word a day instead of a whole passage, use gel pens and brightly colored paper sprayed with perfume!

Continue to learn handwriting and spelling but do that through copywork not your child’s original thoughts.

For more information about this stage, listen to the free Jot It Down! podcast.

Jot It Down productYou might also consider our Jot It Down! product. It gives you ten original writing projects you can do with your children. These are activities (one per month) that enable you to focus the original writing impulse in a specific direction (fairly tales or writing letters or issuing party invitations). They are delight-driven writing activities and cover a range of writing skills. And your child never has to lift a pencil!

Or check out our Jot It Down! bundle and save. Includes:

Image © Photographerlondon | Dreamstime.com