Posts Tagged ‘Try It’

Try It: Clever Combinations

Brave Writer Try It

Wordplay is a great way to make grammar concepts stick! 

When two words team up to create one, you’ve got a compound word. And compound words offer a lively opportunity for active wordplay.

Let’s make some clever combinations!

This activity is from the Arrow (ages 11-12) for the book It Ain’t So Awful, Falafel by Firoozeh Dumas.

Encourage your kids to combine an everyday noun with a food item, then let your imaginations soar!

EVERYDAY OBJECTS

mail
cat
glass
book
daisy
poodle
wool
chair
keyboard
straw
pencil
desk

FOODS

pizza
steak
mozzarella
anchovy
artichoke
onion
banana
kiwi
popsicle
lemonade
granola
cookie

Print this chart and cut out the words or write them on index cards for easier mixing and matching.

Ask your child: Do you want to

  • smoosh the words together to make a closed compound, 
  • leave a space to create an open compound word, or
  • include a hyphen to hook up a hyphenated compound word?

How would it feel to receive pizza mail? Is kiwi-wool green yarn or a sign of mold?

You can even turn this into a game!

One person acts out the word (charades-style) while the others try to guess the creative compound word.

Wordplay for the win! 


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Try It: Free Writers

Brave Writer Try It Free Writers

Liberate your young writers with freewriting!

See thoughts and ideas develop right on the page with this core writing practice for young and old! 

Veteran freewriters, keep scrolling for a fun ranking activity! (And get some neat insights into your kid-writers!) 

New to Freewriting?

Here’s a quick guide:

  • Hand out pencils.
  • Hand out scratch paper (you might wrinkle it first so it’s clear it’s not meant to be perfect).
  • Give this writing prompt: If I had all the money in the world or all the time in the world, I would… (Or pick a prompt from our blog or write whatever comes to mind.)
  • Set the timer for three minutes.
  • Everyone writes (including YOU!) for the full three minutes.
  • Punctuation and spelling errors are welcome.
  • Write “I’m stuck” if you run out of things to say.
  • Stop when the bell dings!

Don’t read your child’s writing! Invite them to read their own freewrite aloud (if they want to—not required).

Celebrate the content and the effort.

Write again on another day!

Already Freewriting Regularly?

Play with freewriting in new places

  • under the table
  • in a tent
  • on the floor next to the dog
  • in the hammock with a clipboard 
  • on the big rock at the park
  • in a blanket fort
  • under a beach umbrella 
  • in the car

After a few playful writing sessions, encourage each child to rank the spots and share what they liked best about writing there! 

All ‘Try It’ Activities


Brave Writer® programs teach writing using your child’s body, mind, and heart.
Discover why writing is the key to all of learning!


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Try It: Interview at 11:00

Brave Writer Try It Interview

Think of a bookish character!

Got one? 

  • What made you think of them?
  • What do you like about that character?
  • What do you loathe (if anything)?
  • Would you want to have dinner with them?
  • What would you ask?

Enquiring minds want to know!

Research involves knowing the content so well that you can ask and answer questions accurately. 

Try interviewing your character!

If the answers to the questions below aren’t given in the book, imagine the answers based on the character’s personality, preferences, and experiences. Feel free to reread parts of the book for help.

Interview at 11:00

Imagine you’re sitting across a table from your character now and ask directly:

  • What’s your favorite color?
  • What series are you binging on your streaming service?
  • How do you feel about vegetarianism?
  • If you could get away with it, would you steal an item you wish you had?
  • What dream do you have for the world?
  • What would you change in your life if you could?

Justify your possible answers to someone who has read the book!

Now, encourage your kids to do the same.

That’s right—YOU go first, then have them try!

All ‘Try It’ Activities


Brave Writer® programs teach writing using your child’s body, mind, and heart.
Discover why writing is the key to all of learning!


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Try It: Pushy Prepositions

Brave Writer

Are you ready to bring some kinesthetic learning to your living room?

Give your kids an a-ha moment about a grammar concept they use daily!

Pushy Prepositions!

Grab a chair. Your child will act out the prepositions as you direct them.

  1. Stand beside the chair.
  2. Crawl under it.
  3. Sit on it.
  4. Fall off it (carefully!).
  5. Roll around the chair to the back.
  6. Point to the seat.
  7. Hop away from the chair.
  8. Jump near it.
  9. Lean against it.
  10. Run your hand along the top of the chair.

Now have your child “push” you around with prepositions.

Ready? Go!

All ‘Try It’ Activities


Brave Writer® programs teach writing using your child’s body, mind, and heart.
Discover why writing is the key to all of learning!


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Try It: Reading Faces

Brave Writer Try It Reading Faces

Did you know that your little ones are already great at reading? Try our ideas below and see!

Reading Faces

  • Pick up a board or picture book (or for older kids, screenshot a YouTube video)
  • Read character facial expressions. (It’s okay if your child sees a different emotion than you do. Show interest and learn why!)
JoyFearRelief
AngerEffortTired
WorrySurpriseSadness
  • Ask: how do you know what that face is saying? Identify a curved mouth, raised eyebrows, a crinkled nose, and more.
  • Next, make your own faces. See if you can guess each other’s emotions by reading each other’s faces. 

Remember, we read more than the alphabet every day!

Explore more activities like this one in the Wordless Picture Book Quill

All ‘Try It’ Activities


Brave Writer® programs teach writing using your child’s body, mind, and heart.
Discover why writing is the key to all of learning!


Brave Writer Get Started