Archive for the ‘Homeschool Advice’ Category

Be a Student of Your Student

Be a Student of Your Student

Number one job: learn your kids.

Get to know their:

  • habits,
  • preferences,
  • natural inclinations,
  • what they love,
  • what they hate,
  • what lights them up,
  • what dims their shine.

When you are frustrated by a child’s lack of enthusiasm or energy or commitment, step back and observe. See what’s standing in the way. Being a detective is part of homeschooling so count it. It’s not off task or adjacent. It IS the task.

The better you know your REAL child (the one in front of you), the better the education you can offer that child.

It’s okay to take notes, to consult with your kid.

  • How was that for you?
  • More of this?
  • Less of that?
  • What else do you need to feel successful?

Give yourself time and permission to understand your child’s needs rather than feeling invalidated by them.

You can do it! I believe in you.


This post is originally from Instagram and @juliebravewriter is my account there so come follow along for more conversations like this one!


The Brave Learner

Happiness

Happiness

Happiness. That elusive subjective experience. I was thinking about it today—how we want our kids to be happy, but please Oh Guiding Force of the Universe, let them be happy about the right things! So you watch them light up over Fortnite but see a crest-fallen face as you drag your child away from the computer to the kitchen table.

Do you feel guilty? Do you wonder what to do? Should your child only ever play the game or watch TV—to ensure happiness? Or should you end the entertainment in favor of read aloud time or math problems, even if your child acts miserable or complains?

Whenever we transition from an effortless pleasure to a task that requires grit or concentration, a let down follows. You’ve experienced it—the transition from relaxing with a cup of tea while scrolling through Instagram, to regrouping to prepare lunch. One is easy—inducing a feeling of contentment. The other requires focus and work. The transition is felt as a loss. You don’t get to happiness automatically.

Your kids are the same. Don’t worry that happiness is not immediately evident in the schoolish task. Support the transition with a shoulder rub, or accompanying the little gal or guy from sofa to table, or by chatting about the fun first and then gathering energy for the new task. Happiness is not static. It ebbs and flows. You can confidently lead by letting your child know that sometimes fun is on the agenda and sometimes a pivot to the effort of intentional learning is the next item on the agenda—and you’ll be there to help that adjustment with kindness and companionship. Tolerating the momentary grief or sadness associated with the transition is how you support the move from one activity to the next.

Happiness matters, but it’s not the only emotion your kids will feel. It’s okay to help your child cope.


This post is originally from Instagram and @juliebravewriter is my account there so come follow along for more conversations like this one!


The Brave Learner

Blog Roundup: October 2019 Edition

Welcome to the latest Brave Writer blog roundup! See how other homeschooling families use Brave Writer products and practice the Brave Writer Lifestyle.

From Brave Writer to Brave Learning – Lynna (Homeschooling without Training Wheels)

“Julie Bogart, founder of Brave Writer and gentle encourager of homeschool moms everywhere, joins us to talk about the journey from Brave Writer to publishing her recently released book The Brave Learner!” Listen to the podcast.

4 Simple Ways to Encourage Your Teen to Write – Kay (Heart-to-Heart Homeschooling)

“More than once I’ve found myself sitting in front of my laptop where that spinning ‘stuck’ icon is in my brain, not the computer screen. (I have a Mac and call it the spinning beach ball of death 🤪) So I get why our teens struggle to write sometimes when we give them an assignment. At times the words just won’t come.” Read more.

Mindfulness for Kids – Marnie (Carrots are Orange)

“Mindfulness for kids is a trendy topic these days but oh so important. The idea that adults can nurture a life skill – like teaching mindfulness – to help kids relax their bodies, to be conscious of their relationship to the world, to breath through painful emotions, to be present, to be emotionally intelligent, in other words, to be mindful, is incredibly powerful.” Read more.


If you write about an aspect of the Brave Writer Lifestyle, let us know! Email your post’s url to blog@bravewriter.com


Brave Writer Lifestyle

Replay: Homeschooling + Holidays

Homeschooling through the Holidays REPLAY

I love homeschooling in the fall (the fragrance of newly sharpened pencils and Scotch tape—right Kathleen Kelly?). October also signals a “let’s get a lot done because the holidays are coming” vibe.

So I’ve got three principles to keep in mind.

Less is more.

Focus on the holidays and get learning tossed into the bargain.

Go slow to go fast.

Rushing reduces what’s learned. Better to learn one thing well than cover a slew of things in a hurry. Use the holidays as your one thing. Dive deep, milk it. Use The Continent of Learning to help you, The Brave Learner, pages 24-27.

Collaborate.

Rely on each other. Share the load. If you don’t have local friends, reach out to online ones. You can partner to plan lessons or parties or celebrate wins or get fresh ideas.
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Check out the webinar I did that goes into this topic in depth: 

Homeschooling through the Holidays

Homeschooling through the Holidays

Let’s handle it right now. You see the holidays right over the horizon. The temptation is to put a lot of pressure on October so you can glide through November and December guilt-free.

I have a three-step plan to help you keep your sanity as the holidays approach. If you’d like to hear about it, join me tomorrow for a free LIVE webinar (links below). Can’t wait to see you! It’s been too long.


Want to learn more?

Join me Tuesday (Oct. 8) at 11:30 AM ET

on Facebook or Zoom!


Did you miss the live broadcast? No problem! Watch the replay here:

Homeschooling through the Holidays REPLAY