Archive for the ‘Boomerang’ Category

Boomerang Book Club: April 2019

Boomerang Book Club April 2019

Did you know that Brave Writer’s Boomerang Book Club discussions are drawn from rich works of fiction that easily fulfill the English credit requirement for literature for a year of high school?

We provide a virtual coffee house—where students gather to freely discuss the novels they read at home. Plus a FREE digital copy of our language arts guide based on the book selection for the month is provided.


[This post contains Amazon affiliate links. When you click on those links to make purchases,
Brave Writer receives compensation at no extra cost to you. Thank you!]


April’s selection for the Boomerang Book Club (ages 13-18) is Fahrenheit 451 by Ray Bradbury.

A modern classic, Fahrenheit 451 explores a futuristic world where television rules and books burn. Guy Montag is a fireman who starts fires—his job, to burn books and the buildings in which they are found. Through a series of events, Montag becomes disillusioned with the anti-intellectual society in which he lives and begins to question all he knows to be true.

Purchase the novel.

Homeschool students especially need the chance to talk about what they read—yet the busy mother-of-many doesn’t always have time to read those lengthy dense books, let alone discuss them in depth! And that’s where we come in. Teenagers are invited to join our virtual book discussion club, conducted entirely online in the Brave Writer classroom.

REGISTER HERE

Caveat: Please remember that you’re the parent. If you have doubts about the content of a particular book, please check the reviews of the novel or read it for yourself first. Pouch and Boomerang books in particular may include sexuality, graphic language, and mature themes.


Also starting in April are our Arrow and Pouch Book Clubs.

Boomerang Book Club: March 2019

Brave Writer Boomerang Book Club

Brave Writer’s Boomerang Book Club is the place to be in March!

Johannah Bogart, Julie’s 28 year old homeschooled daughter, will guide students in provocative discussion of the Boomerang books. These discussions are intended to teach your kids literary analysis without the burden of essay writing. All the Big Juicy Conversations about the books will lead to that special brain development—rhetorical insight—that leads to effective essay writing later.

Plus a FREE digital copy of our language arts guide based on the book selection for the month is provided.


[This post contains Amazon affiliate links. When you click on those links to make purchases,
Brave Writer receives compensation at no extra cost to you. Thank you!]


March’s selection for the Boomerang Book Club (ages 13-18) is Wolf Hollow by Lauren Wolk.

In Wolf Hollow, a heartwarming and heartbreaking coming of age story, Annabelle finds the courage to stand up to the new girl in town and learns you cannot help everyone, no matter how much you care. Set in rural Pennsylvania during WWII, this is a tale of resilience, strength, and compassion in the face of injustice. Available as an audiobook read by Emily Rankin.

Purchase the novel.

Homeschool students especially need the chance to talk about what they read—yet the busy mother-of-many doesn’t always have time to read those lengthy dense books, let alone discuss them in depth! And that’s where we come in. Teenagers are invited to join our virtual book discussion club, conducted entirely online in the Brave Writer classroom.

REGISTER HERE

Caveat: Please remember that you’re the parent. If you have doubts about the content of a particular book, please check the reviews of the novel or read it for yourself first. Pouch and Boomerang books in particular may include sexuality, graphic language, and mature themes.


Also starting in March are our Arrow and Pouch Book Clubs.

Happy Birthday, Rebecca Stead!

Brave Writer Happy Birthday Rebecca Stead

In celebration of Rebecca Stead’s birthday on January 16, the Boomerang based on her book, When You Reach Me, is:

HALF PRICE till Friday, January 18 midnight ET ($5.95)!


[This post contains Amazon affiliate links. When you click on those links to make purchases,
Brave Writer receives compensation at no extra cost to you. Thank you!]


Born on January 16, 1968, Rebecca Stead is the author of the Newbery Medal-winning and best-selling novel When You Reach Me.

Shortly after a fall-out with her best friend, sixth grader Miranda starts receiving mysterious notes, and she doesn’t know what to do. The notes tell her that she must write a letter—a true story, and that she can’t share her mission with anyone.

It would be easy to ignore the strange messages, except that whoever is leaving them has an uncanny ability to predict the future. If that is the case, then Miranda has a big problem—because the notes tell her that someone is going to die, and she might be too late to stop it.—Amazon

BoomerangLearn language arts with When You Reach Me Boomerang!

The Boomerang is a digital downloadable product that features copywork and dictation passages from a specific read aloud novel. It includes notes about how to teach spelling, grammar, and literary devices found in the passages. It is geared toward 7th to 10th graders (ages 12—advanced, 13-15) and is the indispensable tool for Brave Writer parents who want to teach language arts in a natural, literature-bathed context.

So, celebrate Rebecca Stead’s birthday and take advantage of this special offer today!

Also, if you’d like to buy a copy of the novel, it’s available through Amazon: When You Reach Me

February 2019 Boomerang Book Club

Brave Writer 2019 Feb Boomerang Book Club

Dive into the new year with excellent literature and sign up for our February Boomerang Book Club. After all, what could be a better way to spend the beginning of a new year than with good books and community for your children?

Homeschool students especially need the chance to talk about what they read—yet the busy mother-of-many doesn’t always have time to read those lengthy dense books, let alone discuss them in depth! And that’s where we come in. Teenagers are invited to join our virtual book discussion club, conducted entirely online in the Brave Writer classroom.

Also a FREE digital copy of our language arts guide based on the book selection for the month is provided.


[This post contains Amazon affiliate links. When you click on those links to make purchases,
Brave Writer receives compensation at no extra cost to you. Thank you!]


February’s selection for the Boomerang Book Club is March by John Lewis.

With vivid detail only a graphic novel could create, March brings a first-hand account of the Civil Rights movement and the life of U.S. Congressman John Lewis to the page. Book one in the three-part autobiographical series covers Lewis’ early life on a sharecropper’s farm in Alabama, his life-changing meeting with Martin Luther King Jr., and the beginning of the Nashville Student Movement and their struggles to fight segregation with nonviolent lunch counter sit-ins.

Purchase the novel here.

Let Brave Writer help you. These book discussions are drawn from entertaining works of fiction that your kids are sure to love!

REGISTER HERE

Caveat: Please remember that you’re the parent. If you have doubts about the content of a particular book, please check the reviews of the novel or read it for yourself first. Pouch and Boomerang books in particular may include sexuality, graphic language, and mature themes.


Also starting in February are our Arrow and Pouch Book Clubs.

Movie Wednesday: Sense and Sensibility

Brave Writer Movie Wednesday Sense and Sensibility

by Amy Frantz

The Dashwood sisters, Elinor, Marianne, and Margaret, are left penniless when Mr. Dashwood passes away, leaving everything to their half-brother who forces them to move out of their own home and live meagerly with distant relatives. In the country, the young women encounter love and heartache as they navigate their new social status.


[This post contains Amazon affiliate links. When you click on those links to make purchases,
Brave Writer receives compensation at no extra cost to you. Thank you!]


Sense and Sensibility by Jane Austen was originally published in 1811. It’s original by line read: “By a Lady.” But today Jane Austen might be one of the most recognizable author names on any given shelf in a bookstore.

In 1995 Austen’s novel was adapted to the big screen as a major motion picture. Directed by Ang Lee, the film stars Emma Thompson, Alan Rickman, Kate Winslet, and Hugh Grant.

Much of Austen’s work, if not all of it, falls under the genre of novels of manners. Novels of manners are deeply concerned with, well, manners. That is to say, the social conventions, restrictions, and behaviors that “define a class.”

In Sense and Sensibility, a lot of emphasis is given to how characters behave when interacting with others, sometimes in juxtaposition with how society feels they ought to behave. Characters who behave “improperly” are sneered at or judged by those around them.

A central struggle many characters face is how to forge meaningful relationships around the restrictions on class and gender interactions put on them by society, and much of both the comedy and drama arises from how awkward following these conventions can make a conversation.

Discussion Questions

  • At the time during which Sense and Sensibility is set only men could inherit property, so the Dashwood sisters and their mother are deprived of their home and forced to live in the countryside. What other examples from the story can you think of that show the different social restrictions and expectations placed on men and women?
  • Do you think the film provides sufficient evidence of the change in Marianne’s affections towards Colonel Brandon at the end of the film or does it feel too sudden? Explain your answer.
  • Of the Dashwood sisters, whom do you relate to the most and why?
  • A character arc is when a character fundamentally changes as a result of their experiences. Example: Marianne journeys from innocent naivety to a more subdued practicality after her heart is broken by Willoughby. Do you think Elinor has a character arc? And if so, in what ways do you think she demonstrates growth over the course of the story?

Additional Resources

Brave Writer Boomerang Book ClubSign up now for our online Boomerang Book Club for Sense and Sensibility (class begins January 1, 2019).

Our book discussions are drawn from rich works of fiction that will easily fulfill the English credit requirement for literature for a year of high school.

Also check out our Brave Writer ideas for a Jane Austen Deep Dive including:

  • novels,
  • films,
  • writing
  • prompts,
  • tutorials, and more!

Amy Frantz is a Brave Writer alum and now works as a Virtual Marketing Assistant for Brave Writer.


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