Movie Wednesday: The Great Gatsby

Movie Wednesday: The Great Gatsby

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Written in 1925 by F. Scott Fitzgerald, The Great Gatsby is widely considered a masterpiece. Over the years it’s been adapted into ballets, plays, and several films; and in 2013 it was made into a film again, a luscious extravaganza directed by Baz Luhrmann  and starring Leonardo DiCaprio (in order to evaluate whether or not this PG-13 movie is appropriate for your family, we recommend watching it first and/or using the Kids-in-Mind website).

Plot Summary

In the 1920s, Nick Carraway spends a summer on Long Island, experiencing the wild lifestyle of the East and visiting his beautiful cousin Daisy. Nick’s neighbor, Mr Gatsby, throws the most expensive and exciting parties in the country, even though he himself is never seen. All these parties are held for one reason—to attract Daisy, whom Gatsby has loved for years. But is there any hope for Daisy and Gatsby when they finally meet again? And what will happen when Daisy’s brutal husband Tom finds out?

Discussion Questions

  • How do you think the film compares to to the book?
  • Which character do you sympathize with the most and why? Do you think any of them are irrefutably right or wrong in what they believe and do? Explain.
  • The film is full of visual metaphors—the clock Gatsby nearly breaks, doors banging open, Daisy’s pearl necklace and the green light at the end of the dock. What do you think these represent?
  • The ending of the film is extremely downbeat, with none of the main characters ending up truly happy. Do you prefer happy endings in films? Why or why not.

Additional Resources

Great Gatsby Fried Chicken – How to make Great Gatsby fried chicken!

How to plan a Great Gatsby themed party – Tinsel chandeliers, table settings, and flowers—everything you might need for your Great Gatsby themed party.

Boomerang The Great GatsbyLearn language arts with the Great Gatsby Boomerang!

The Boomerang is a monthly digital downloadable product that features copywork and dictation passages from a specific read aloud novel. It is geared toward 8th to 10th graders (ages 12—advanced, 13-15) and is the indispensable tool for Brave Writer parents who want to teach language arts in a natural, literature-bathed context.

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