Archive for the ‘Email’ Category

A Wobbly Start

A Wobbly Start

My exchange with Brave Writer mom, Jenny:

Hi Julie!

I’ll try and make this quick because I know you get so many questions like this. In fact, I’ll bullet point this email. 😉

We are going to have a wobbly start to our homeschool year this year. We lost our fifth babe just over a week ago at 27 weeks after finding out at 20 weeks that this was most likely going to be the case. SO, it’s been quite an emotionally trying summer and it will be a tricky start to a new year of school.

Yes! My goodness. Please take your time. Feather in the subjects. Do one a day for a while. Just allow yourselves to grieve and heal.

Our kiddos are 9,9, 4 (almost 5), and 3. Up to now for [Language Arts] we have done rich read alouds, Explode the Code, and some narration. My 9 year ago old boy loves to write and is constantly writing lists, notes, comic books (that his twin illustrates), and short stories. He seems to be picking up spelling just through his own reading and ETC. My 9 year old daughter struggles with writing. She is an artist and free spirit. Since we have been consistent with poetry tea time, she HAS been writing poetry, which I love seeing but she does have to ask how almost every word is spelled. She reads tons, but it’s all about the story and she doesn’t seem to at all notice spelling, and ETC doesn’t seem to seep in either.

You want to help her with copywork and dictation practice. This will help, over time. Don’t expect over night changes. Invest and allow time and practice to bring growth.

SO, all this to say, [Brave Writer] has been such an encouragement to our family through your talks, poetry tea time and the Alliance (though I’m terrible about getting on there), and I’m ready to jump in to [Language Arts], Brave Writer style. I’ve purchased a set of Arrows, Partnership Writing (for the 9 year olds) , and Jot it Down (to possibly begin with the 5 year old). My question is, I know I should start simple. In this case, what do you recommend? Just the Arrows? Maybe the Arrows plus Partnership Writing for my son? Sigh. I’m super phlegmatic and I’m afraid if I don’t have things lined up, we won’t do any of it! Anyway, any input you have would be great!

I think starting with the one that seems easiest and happiest is the way to go. Then check in with yourself again in one or two months and add the next one. These are great choices, but feel free to go slowly!

So much for the short bullet points! 😉

Thanks for being you and sharing yourself with all of us! I’m currently having a couple of days of rest with just my husband and I’m catching up on some periscopes and things I’ve missed and he was like, “Boy, you sure are obsessing over Julie Bogart or Cheryl Mason or whoever that is!” I was like, “First of all, I’ve been talking to you about Charlotte Mason for 9 years now, and you still don’t have her name right and you think she’s alive doing a periscope?!” Hehe

That’s hilarious!! “Cheryl Mason” is going to be my new nom de plume. 🙂

But also, he’s got it right that “Cheryl Mason” and Julie Bogart are my educational philosophy/ homeschool gurus!

Yes! Perfect.

Jenny, hugs. Don’t under estimate how big a toll a loss like this takes. Your kids are young. If you did nothing for a while, you’d still be fine.

Much much love to you all.

Julie

A World of Difference

A World of DifferenceWith Angie, who organized the Muslim Homeschool Network Conference

Hi Julie,

I hope you’re doing well! We miss you out here in Sunny SoCal!! 🙂

I just wanted to share with you (and please share with Rita Cevasco as well!) our struggle, in hopes that it will help other families.

Last year around this time my then 6 year old was a reluctant writer. She knew how to write letters but hated holding a pencil. I would hear the common complaints like “it hurts my hands” or “it’s boring” etc. …Not to mention my 6 year old was reading far beyond her age, reading classics with advanced vocabulary and I was stunned that she was doing amazingly with reading and struggling so much with writing?! I was baffled.

Finally, a friend introduced me to Brave Writer! After a few Julie scopes and exploring the website I was hooked. We started with Jot It Down. My daughter was telling me funny poems, writing stories, and asking me to jot down all sorts of writing that seemed to be exploding out of her imagination! Her writing voice was beautiful. I was thrilled and so was she!

Then we got to the mechanics. I assumed since her reading level was beyond her 6.5 years, that A Quiver of Arrows would be the right fit. She loved Mr. Popper’s Penguins and Charlotte’s Web and had read them multiple times. I had skimmed through The Wand but Hop on Pop and Amelia Bedelia were not where she was reading at all so I just ignored The Wand all together. And this was my mistake, READING LEVEL DOES NOT EQUAL WRITING LEVEL!! …Most of the words during French dictation were misspelled no matter how many times we looked them over. I was stressed, she was annoyed, so I backed off.

At that time I was thinking that maybe this curriculum wasn’t a good fit for some reason, but then I decided to give The Wand a shot… and it was the perfect fit! The sentences were simple and short enough that she felt confident doing the copywork. Spelling was fun with the post-it notes and hands-on activities. My daughter was loving it. Over the course of the year, her spelling improved dramatically and she was now loving picking up a pencil and writing her thoughts, lists, stories, notes to her father and I, and even journaling her favorite trips ON HER OWN?!? My mind was blown. It took us a year or so to finish all 3 levels and its has made a WORLD of difference. She has recently started learning cursive after begging me to get her a cursive writing book.

Thank you and thank Rita for me as well. I never thought such a different mind set and simply unique curriculum could make such a difference but it really has made a world of difference. As a new homeschooler, this was GOLD and I wholeheartedly recommend the Jot it Down + the Wand to anyone who has a struggling writer!

Thank you from the bottom of my heart!!
Angie


Trees in the Forest: Growing Readers and Writers through Deep Comprehension (Volume 1)Great news! Rita Cevasco’s book, Trees in the Forest: Growing Readers and Writers through Deep Comprehension, is on sale now through April 30, 2017 (learn more about Rita’s book)!

Take 30% off your purchase using this discount code:

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“The proof is found in our kids”

The proof is found in our kids

Brave Writer mom, Kim, writes:

What a difference Brave Writer has made for us! It is not just a writing curriculum, but an entire language arts philosophy and routine, one that we plan to stick with all the way through.

We found Brave Writer after our daughter’s first grade year. In first grade, we followed the language arts recommendations of another curriculum we were using and were sorely disappointed. Our daughter, who loved to read and didn’t mind handwriting, began to hate language arts. It was her least favorite subject. We knew something was wrong and began searching for an alternative.

We are so grateful that we found Brave Writer! We have used it for 2nd and 3rd grade now, and will use it for her upcoming 4th grade year along with the Quiver of Arrows for our son in 1st grade.

Over the years, we have purchased the Writer’s Jungle (fantastic resource!), Jot it Down (really helped me get the feel of an effective language arts routine & writing projects for lower elementary), many individual Arrow guides (we typically use 9 per year), and new this year, the Quiver of Arrows for 1st-2nd graders.

Being a speech therapist on the side when I’m not teaching my kids, I know a thing or two about speech and language development. I know that kids learn to speak well when they are exposed to good speech models and a rich language environment. And so Brave Writer’s natural approach to writing makes so much sense to me. Children will learn to be great writers when they are regularly exposed to models of great writing and a language rich environment.

Reading great writing (exemplified by the book titles chosen for the Arrow of Boomerang guides) and following the routines of copywork, dictation, French dictation (copy work that is fill-in-the-blank style in places to target tricky spelling words or punctuation), and reverse dictation (unique editing exercises), weekly Freewriting exercises to get their ideas flowing on paper, monthly writing projects, and our favorite, weekly poetry tea times, are the backbone of this approach.

Julie Bogart has so much wisdom to impart, and what makes her approach unique is that she herself is a professional writer. She gets what it takes to be a great writer in the real world, and rather than bogging kids down with worksheets and endless grammar exercises, each Arrow guide comes with grammar notes for each copy work/dictation passage, so you can address grammar naturally as it comes up, and each Arrow guide focuses on a key literary element that makes great writing—similes and metaphors, imagery, viewpoint, alliteration, etc.—and has a writing exercise to allow kids to practice it in their own writing.

But the proof is found in our kids. This will be our second child’s first year with Brave Writer, but all 3 of our kids have benefited from our language arts routine—even our youngest, having just turned 3, has been known to wander the house reciting bits of poetry she heard during poetry tea time. Language Arts may not be our daughter’s favorite subject yet—she loves history, science, & art—but she still loves to read, willingly participates in writing, and is able to effectively express her ideas through writing. And she’s learned to love poetry and even write some original poems on her own just for fun.

I’d call that a success.

Kim


Learn more about Brave Writer

“I am writing!”

I am writing

Dear Julie and Brave Writer Gang,

I just found this note on the dry erase board in our school room. Thought you might enjoy it.

Golly gee – doesn’t she know it’s summer break??? Tee hee hee. 😉

Thank you for helping to restore my daughter’s love of writing!

~Kathleen

Learn about Brave Writer

Help with Dictation

Fitting Dictation Into Your Homeschool

A Brave Writer mom asks about her 11 year old daughter who has a low tolerance for schoolwork and struggles with spelling:

I want to start dictation with her but am not sure where and how to fit it in.

Hi! I think it is a good idea to use a passage she knows well for dictation. Initially she may even need you to offer to verbally spell words she is unsure of as you dictate. This is still great experience for her as she will have to listen and write what you say (another way to encode the spellings). Exaggerate your pauses for commas and make a strong finish sound when you get to periods. Help her in all the ways you can. If she needs some words written in advance on a notecard to copy when she hears you say them, then do that too!

You might try our practice of French-style dictation. This is where you choose which words will be written. You type the entire passage, then you omit some of the words and replace them with blank lines. Print the whole thing. Read the passage aloud and she reads along with you until she gets to a blank space. When she hears the word that goes there, she will write it. This is a wonderful, gradual practice for kids who are just struggling to write and spell. You can isolate words she knows well the first time you do it so she has success. Then gradually include a word or two she doesn’t know well and prep her before the dictation by orally spelling them together.

For freewriting: spelling doesn’t matter AT ALL. It doesn’t matter if she misspells every word. You can help her if she calls out to you in the middle of a freewrite by spelling it back to her, but remind her that all spellings can be cleaned up later. That’s not the goal of freewriting. If there are words she can’t even attempt in freewriting, then write them for her on a white board or note pad before she begins so she can copy them exactly.

Always use Spell Check on the computer (it teaches kids a lot) and offer her the opportunity to correct her own work against the original so that she is the one making the connection between where she missed the spelling and what it should be.

Keep ALL these sessions short. She will tire easily (it’s an enormous amount of work for her). Give her shoulder rubs and light candles. Eat treats after she finishes. Use pretty paper and flowing pens—let her write in colors other than blue or black.

Make this a nourishing experience, not just school work. Remind her of how smart she is and how you know that she is capable of growing in this arena. Keep her first dictation in a file and compare it to one six months and then a year from now so she can see her progress.

Good luck!

Want to learn more?
Check out our Copywork and Dictation webinar!