Archive for the ‘Podcasts’ Category

Podcast: Do You Have the Wrong Personality for Your Temperament?

Brave Writer Podcast

I am recording some of my Tea with Julie emails for the podcast for those of you who prefer to listen. These are messages of support for your life of parenting and educating, as well as taking good care of you. If you’d like to receive them, they are free. Sign up at bravewriter.com/tea


Does it sometimes feel like your personality and your temperament are at odds with one another?

Whether you keep a ship-shape house or you’re relaxed and casual, let me promise you this: There is no one personality type better suited to homeschooling than another. And no one personality type better for:

  • parenting,
  • loving,
  • or nurturing.

Each has its own strengths and liabilities, and the goal is to work to become more self-aware, recognize when we are in our element, and find out what it means to best serve the moment.

Show Notes

Complete Tea with Julie notes can be found HERE.

Resources

  • If you’d like to get these Tea for Julie newsletters in your inbox every week, sign up at bravewriter.com/tea.

Connect with Julie

Brave Writer Podcast

Podcast: Meet Your Own Needs

Brave Writer Podcast

I am recording some of my Tea with Julie emails for the podcast for those of you who prefer to listen. These are messages of support for your life of parenting and educating, as well as taking good care of you. If you’d like to receive them, they are free. Sign up at bravewriter.com/tea


A family is an interdependent system—no one person can carry it alone. There must be give and take, support and nurture for each person, even if in uneven doses at times.

All you can do is become the healthiest version of you that you can be—taking care of your welfare so that you don’t wake up one day and “flip out.”

You’ll be given good advice: Be generous. Give. Share. Listen. Pay attention. Make adjustments. Become a partner to your kids, to your spouse. Forgive. Find the good, the true, the pure. Let go of petty resentments and high expectations.

But you also need to take care of you. Be sure that you, the care-giver, are being given care too—by someone, somehow, somewhere. It’s how you keep going.

When you hit your limits, you’ll get advice to give more. You’ll be told what the ideals are. You’ll be reminded of your original goals. You’ll try harder. We women are especially likely to take this advice to heart.

Just remember: in the trying (which is right and noble and good), stand up for you too. You matter as much to the whole system as all the people you love and serve freely every day.

Be good to you, no matter what that looks like. You get one life, too. It needs to be a good, peace-filled, lovely one. No Joan of Abeccas here. No Teresa of Calculadders allowed.

Show Notes

Self-care is essential to the happy functioning of your family.

Self-care is not, however, ensuring that everyone in your family is behaving according to your plans and standards so that you can finally have a rest.

Self-care happens in the middle of the muddle, when things are at their most stressful, when you feel the least capable of meeting your own expectations and hopes. That frazzled feeling? A flashing red warning light that you need to take a self-appointed time out.

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Podcast: The Courage to Change

Brave Writer Podcast

So many of you asked to hear my talk from the Wild+Free conference that I recorded it for the podcast! Here it is, as close to what I shared there as possible. “The Courage to Change”—exactly what we all need as we face this uncertain future. I’m here for it, and here for you.  xo Julie

It takes courage to change. The moment we make changes in our lives, we feel uncomfortable—maybe even afraid—about how those changes will impact our relationships. Certainty and predictability are comforting, even when that certainty can be a dreaded rush hour commute to work. Yet on the other side of change, we often feel relief.

Here’s what’s amazing about change: Not only do we have a right to change our minds, but we can change our attitudes and desires, too.

When we make changes in our lives, however, the people in our lives have to adapt to our changes too. That can cause disruption in the relationship. That’s what we’re going to talk about today on the Brave Writer podcast.

Show Notes

Whenever we make a decision that’s in alignment with our values, it may compete with the values or beliefs of others. As a result, we may wind up in conflict—often assuming the other person is wrong to question us. For some reason, each of believes that our beliefs deserve to be the right ones in the room. Even within relatively homogenous or like-minded groups, it’s difficult to get everyone on the same page. Disagreements crop up!

When we talk about the courage to think for ourselves or to change our minds, what we’re really asking is: how welcome is dissent, here, in this group?

Dissent is like chlorine in the pool. It purifies a strong ideological space. Dissent makes us reevaluate the sources of authority that we’ve relied on but perhaps haven’t evaluated critically.

When your child pushes back on a rule you have or an activity you planned, you could put your foot down and say, “Well, this is what we do and you’re going to do it!” But we want to raise independent thinkers—right? That includes thinking independently of people within the family unit.

  • Go down the rabbit hole with your child every now and then.
  • Get behind their dissenting voice.
  • See what it offers that has been overlooked.

By acknowledging dissent, we can use it as an opportunity to change, no matter how uncomfortable that might be.

If you’re looking to create a family of independent thinkers, who can stand on their own, and who have the courage to stand in the face of pressure, you have to begin at home. Look at dissent as an opportunity for critical thinking. Having the courage to change your mind means you get to change yours too.

Resources

Connect with Julie

Brave Writer Podcast

Podcast: Growing Reading & Writing Comprehension with Rita Cevasco, Pt. 2

Brave Writer Podcast

We’re continuing our conversation with the brilliant Rita Cevasco! In case you missed out last podcast episode with the owner and creator of Rooted in Language, go listen to it now.

In this second part, we dive into practical steps to help your kids learn to read.

We talk about:

  • the difference in offerings between Brave Writer and Rooted in Language,
  • who the Pinwheels program is for and what they’ll learn,
  • and how reading comprehension affects kids’ recognition in all areas.

Show Notes

One philosophy that both Brave Writer and Rooted in Language share in common is that learning happens best in relationship and that over time it will grow into independent learning. Having conversations with other people helps us to deepen our understanding of an idea.

Learning can often feel like rote memorization, especially when it comes to reading. But when teaching is approached from a place of understanding the core concepts behind what they are learning, kids realize how much they have to gain from what they are learning and how they can apply it to all aspects of their life.

No one does what Rita and Rooted in Language do for learning challenged kids. They want effective learning, not busy work. They know what facilitates deep learning and what’s going to truly make a difference—especially for kids who are already burnt out with other forms of learning that didn’t work for them. And when you, as a parent, understand the tools, you are in the best position to take them and apply them to your kids in a way that makes sense.

Resources

Connect with Julie

Brave Writer Podcast

Podcast: Growing Reading & Writing Comprehension with Rita Cevasco, Pt. 1

Brave Writer Podcast Rita Cevasco

Learning to read and write is absolutely life-changing, but it doesn’t come easily to all kids. Rita Cevasco is a friend and colleague of mine and the founder of Rooted in Language. We have collaborated together in a homeschooling coop—her teaching reading, I teaching writing—and our teaching styles and points of view mesh beautifully.

In this podcast episode, we talk about:

  • what is going on in our kids’ brains when trying to process their thoughts as sounds,
  • identifying reading disorders such as dyslexia,
  • and how parents can set their expectations appropriately about their child’s progress.

Show Notes

Rooted in Language is a company dedicated to helping parents feel effective in teaching their kids to read and to handwrite, especially if they struggle with language delays. She’s spent over 30 years working as a speech language pathologist and as a reading/writing specialist.

Listen to Part Two.

Resources

Connect with Julie

Brave Writer Podcast