Archive for the ‘Online Classes’ Category

Movie Wednesday: Sense and Sensibility

Brave Writer Movie Wednesday Sense and Sensibility

by Amy Frantz

The Dashwood sisters, Elinor, Marianne, and Margaret, are left penniless when Mr. Dashwood passes away, leaving everything to their half-brother who forces them to move out of their own home and live meagerly with distant relatives. In the country, the young women encounter love and heartache as they navigate their new social status.


[This post contains Amazon affiliate links. When you click on those links to make purchases,
Brave Writer receives compensation at no extra cost to you. Thank you!]


Sense and Sensibility by Jane Austen was originally published in 1811. It’s original by line read: “By a Lady.” But today Jane Austen might be one of the most recognizable author names on any given shelf in a bookstore.

In 1995 Austen’s novel was adapted to the big screen as a major motion picture. Directed by Ang Lee, the film stars Emma Thompson, Alan Rickman, Kate Winslet, and Hugh Grant.

Much of Austen’s work, if not all of it, falls under the genre of novels of manners. Novels of manners are deeply concerned with, well, manners. That is to say, the social conventions, restrictions, and behaviors that “define a class.”

In Sense and Sensibility, a lot of emphasis is given to how characters behave when interacting with others, sometimes in juxtaposition with how society feels they ought to behave. Characters who behave “improperly” are sneered at or judged by those around them.

A central struggle many characters face is how to forge meaningful relationships around the restrictions on class and gender interactions put on them by society, and much of both the comedy and drama arises from how awkward following these conventions can make a conversation.

Discussion Questions

  • At the time during which Sense and Sensibility is set only men could inherit property, so the Dashwood sisters and their mother are deprived of their home and forced to live in the countryside. What other examples from the story can you think of that show the different social restrictions and expectations placed on men and women?
  • Do you think the film provides sufficient evidence of the change in Marianne’s affections towards Colonel Brandon at the end of the film or does it feel too sudden? Explain your answer.
  • Of the Dashwood sisters, whom do you relate to the most and why?
  • A character arc is when a character fundamentally changes as a result of their experiences. Example: Marianne journeys from innocent naivety to a more subdued practicality after her heart is broken by Willoughby. Do you think Elinor has a character arc? And if so, in what ways do you think she demonstrates growth over the course of the story?

Additional Resources

Brave Writer Boomerang Book ClubSign up now for our online Boomerang Book Club for Sense and Sensibility (class begins January 1, 2019).

Our book discussions are drawn from rich works of fiction that will easily fulfill the English credit requirement for literature for a year of high school.

Also check out our Brave Writer ideas for a Jane Austen Deep Dive including:

  • novels,
  • films,
  • writing
  • prompts,
  • tutorials, and more!

Amy Frantz is a Brave Writer alum and now works as a Virtual Marketing Assistant for Brave Writer.


Banner header Arrow Boomerang

January 2019 Boomerang Book Club

Brave Writer Boomerang 2019 January Book Club

The Boomerang Book Club for January 2019 is starting soon! It’s amazing how time flies, but believe it or not it’ll be January before you know it! And with the new year comes new book clubs. You can register for January’s Boomerang Book Club now to ensure your child starts the writing year off on a good foot with some good ol’ Jane Austen.

Homeschool students especially need the chance to talk about what they read—yet the busy mother-of-many doesn’t always have time to read those lengthy dense books, let alone discuss them in depth! And that’s where we come in.

Also a FREE digital copy of our language arts guide based on the book selection for the month is provided.


[This post contains Amazon affiliate links. When you click on those links to make purchases,
Brave Writer receives compensation at no extra cost to you. Thank you!]


January’s selection for the Boomerang Book Club is Sense and Sensibility by Jane Austen.

Jane Austen’s first published work follows the story of two sisters, Elinor and Marianne, as they navigate the perils of the heart and judgments of society in 19th century England. While these sisters take vastly different approaches to life, their love and loyalty remain strong, despite the challenges they face.

Purchase the novel here.

Let Brave Writer help you. These book discussions are drawn from entertaining works of fiction that your kids are sure to love!

REGISTER HERE

Caveat: Please remember that you’re the parent. If you have doubts about the content of a particular book, please check the reviews of the novel or read it for yourself first. Pouch and Boomerang books in particular may include sexuality, graphic language, and mature themes.


Also starting in January are our Arrow and Pouch Book Clubs.

January 2019 Pouch Book Club

Brave Writer Pouch 2019 January Book Club

The Pouch Book Club for January 2019 is starting soon! Can you believe we’re almost halfway through December already? January will be here sooner than you know it, so make sure you sign up for the Pouch Book Club now.

If I could host you all in my cozy living room for book discussion, I would. Instead, Brave Writer provides you a virtual living room space—where students gather to freely discuss the novels they read with you at home. We’ve created a secure environment where kids gather and are guided by a discussion facilitator who helps these kids take their answers deeper. Instead of talking out loud, your kids will use a keyboard and transcribe their thoughts into writing—the kind you can print and save, read again and consider.

Also a FREE digital copy of our language arts guide based on the book selection for the month is provided.


[This post contains Amazon affiliate links. When you click on those links to make purchases,
Brave Writer receives compensation at no extra cost to you. Thank you!]


January’s selection for the Pouch Book Club (ages 11-14) is Number the Stars by Lois Lowry.

As the German troops begin their campaign to “relocate” all the Jews of Denmark, Annemarie Johansen’s family takes in Annemarie’s best friend, Ellen Rosen, and conceals her as part of the family.Through the eyes of ten-year-old Annemarie, we watch as the Danish Resistance smuggles almost the entire Jewish population of Denmark, nearly seven thousand people, across the sea to Sweden. The heroism of an entire nation reminds us that there was pride and human decency in the world even during a time of terror and war. Winner of the 1990 Newbery Medal.—Amazon

Purchase the novel here.

Due to popular demand, Brave Writer now offers a transition book club between the Arrow and Boomerang. The Pouch club is for middle schoolers who want to discuss novels with their peers, who are ready to learn the art of thinking and writing simultaneously all while excited about a great story!

Let Brave Writer help you. These book discussions are drawn from entertaining works of fiction that your kids are sure to love!

REGISTER HERE

Caveat: Please remember that you’re the parent. If you have doubts about the content of a particular book, please check the reviews of the novel or read it for yourself first. Pouch and Boomerang books in particular may include sexuality, graphic language, and mature themes.


Also starting in January are our Arrow and Boomerang Book Clubs.

January 2019 Movie Club Theme: Transformations

January 2019 Movie Club: Transformations

Getting cozy on the couch with a big bowl of popcorn watching movies and counting it as “school” is homeschool at its finest. Grab your teen and your favorite snacks and join us in our first Movie Discussion Club of 2019 (Jan 7—Feb 1). You won’t want to miss this special selection of films.

Discussing movies doesn’t feel like the chore of writing. When we get close to a teen’s passion, the words flow easier. For the teens who love movies, it’s not enough to watch them. They want to rehash the casting choices, the twist in the plot, the unsatisfying ending. Give them a chance to dive deep!

Kick off the new year with discussion about thought-provoking films on the theme of transformation. The big question asked in each of these films set in locations around the world: Given the constraints of the life we are living, is change possible? Join us in this club and discover the filmmakers’ fascinating answers.

Films:

The Breadwinner — Physical transformation. An animated tale set in Afghanistan where an 11-year-old girl takes on the appearance of a boy to support her family.

The Dhamma Brothers — Spiritual transformation. A documentary of what happens to a group of hardened criminals in an Alabama prison when they undertake the grueling 10-day challenge of Vipassana meditation.

Whale Rider — Cultural transformation. Set in New Zealand, an old chief searches desperately for the next leader of the community amongst the boys of the village. He refuses to see that his own granddaughter may be the best choice.

Please Vote for Me — Political transformation. This documentary follows a class of elementary school students in China as they participate in democratic elections to determine who will hold the coveted post of Class Monitor.

Here’s what our students say:

I love the way it doesn’t feel like writing, even though it is! And, instead of just watching the movie, I got to ponder deeper into the movie, versus skimming the surface. THANK YOU SO MUCH!!!!!!!!!!! —Brian N.

[About the Globetrotters—Iran Movie Club] To me, this was more than a movie club. Through these movies, I have learned not only how Iranian movies are made but also about Iranian history, culture, people, religion, geography, law, human rights issues, and much more. I am positive that I have learned a lot more than I could have ever learned in a geography or social studies class. It was an eye opening experience. I just love the club so much. —Meg I.

Sign Up for Our Online Movie Club


Register for Spring Classes before they’re gone!

Online classes for Spring Semester are filling up quickly—hop on over to our 2019 Spring Class Schedule and sign your kiddo(s) up for their favorite picks before we’re sold out!

Brave Writer classes are designed for the busy homeschooling parent:

  • 3-6 weeks in length (accommodating your family calendar).
  • Focused on a specific writing task—allowing a deep dive.
  • Each coach is a published author AND homeschooler.
  • Coaches offer positive, kind, instructive feedback that grows the writing.

January 2019 Arrow Book Club

Brave Writer Arrow January Book Club

The Arrow Book Club for January 2019 is starting soon! It’s hard to believe that December is almost halfway over already, but January will be here sooner than you know it, and we at Brave Writer want to make sure you don’t miss out on the January Arrow Book Club.

If you’re looking for an easy way into online classes for your child, our book clubs are great for that! Kids love “talking” (a.k.a. writing) about books. In these Brave Writer classes, they will be able to discuss the books freely with instructor guidance and encouragement.

Also a FREE digital copy of our language arts guide based on the book is provided.


[This post contains Amazon affiliate links. When you click on those links to make purchases,
Brave Writer receives compensation at no extra cost to you. Thank you!]


January’s Arrow Book Club selection is Sadako and the Thousand Paper Cranes by Eleanor Coerr.

Hiroshima-born Sadako is an active, full-of-life athlete until she falls ill with leukemia. Legend holds that if a sick person folds one thousand paper cranes, they will regain their health. Sadako takes up the challenge with courage and bravery. Based on a true story, this short, classic tale will touch your heart.

Purchase the novel here.

The Arrow Book Club provides an online discussion space (asynchronous, bulletin board style) for students to learn to discuss literature using literary analysis vocabulary without the pressure of writing “essays.” Homeschool students especially need the chance to talk about what they read—-yet the busy mother-of-many doesn’t always have time to take the discussion to a written form.

Let Brave Writer help you. These book discussions are drawn from entertaining works of fiction that your kids are sure to love!

REGISTER HERE

Caveat: Please remember that you’re the parent. If you have doubts about the content of a particular book, please check the reviews of the novel or read it for yourself first.


Also starting in January are our Boomerang and Pouch Book Clubs.