Archive for the ‘Boomerang’ Category

Brave Writer Book Club Party School

Brave Writer Book Club Party School

Introduction by Mary Wilson

Helping my kids make meaningful connections to literature has always been an important part of my homeschool. I have used the Brave Writer Arrow and Boomerang guides for several years to support my efforts.

The Boomerang guides have always included Think Piece questions to facilitate discussion and the recent Arrow guides (those published since 2015) include Big, Juicy questions. These questions inspired me to organize book clubs for my children and their friends in order to facilitate a big, juicy conversation about good books.

Of course, I combined the questions from the guides with the idea of a Brave Writer party school and the Brave Writer book club party school was born. Our family had so much fun at our book club parties that I began to share ideas on my blog. Other homeschooling parents jumped on board and a Brave Writer book club community formed.

In order to encourage and support parents who want to implement creative party school ideas, the Arrow and Boomerang book guides published this year (2017-2018) include a Book Club Party School guide. You’ll find fun ideas for food, activities, games, and more in each guide so that your family can celebrate books together.

As a complement to their annual Arrow or Boomerang subscription, subscribers are invited to a private Facebook group where they can share ideas and inspiration from the book clubs with their own children. Many participants also share their ideas on Instagram using the hashtag: #bwbookclub.

Below are just a few of the wonderful ideas from our Brave Writer book club community this year:

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Happy Birthday, Jane Austen!

Happy Birthday Jane Austen SALE
In celebration of Jane Austen’s birthday (December 16th, 1775), the Boomerang based on her novel, Pride and Prejudice, is:

HALF PRICE till Sunday, Dec. 17 midnight ET ($5.95)!

OFFER HAS EXPIRED

Born on December 16th, 1775, Jane Austen has become one of the most enduring staples of English literature. Her works have inspired films, books, and flurries of essays and other analysis. But in her own lifetime, Jane Austen published her novels anonymously (some with the famous by line: “By a Lady”) and they brought her little fame or recognition.


[This post contains Amazon affiliate links. When you click on those links to make purchases,
Brave Writer receives compensation at no extra cost to you. Thank you!]


Published in 1813, Pride and Prejudice is arguably Austen’s most famous work and has been adapted (to screen and other mediums) numerous times. A romance novel and a social commentary, it follows its protagonist, Elizabeth Bennet, as she navigates English social restrictions, a complicated family, and of course the seemingly antagonistic attentions of a certain Mr. Darcy.

Austen’s novels are known for their critique of English society and commentary on the difficulties of women being dependent upon making good marriages for financial stability and happiness. Although her heroines live forever in the imaginations of her readership, very little is known of the woman herself. The details of Austen’s life remain murky due in part to family members destroying many of her letters. Only a handful survive to this day, making the interpretation of the life of Jane Austen somewhat difficult.

Most of what remains of Jane Austen is what we find in her novels; a sharp ironic wit, social critique, and unabashed romance for good measure. These qualities and so much more have ensured that Jane Austen’s novels are still avidly read to this day.

So, celebrate Jane Austen’s birthday and take advantage of this special offer today!

Also, if you’d like to buy a copy of the novel, it’s available through Amazon: Pride and Prejudice

Boomerang

This Boomerang is also part of the Early English Boomerang collection!

The Boomerang is a digital downloadable product that features copywork and dictation passages from a specific read aloud novel. It is geared toward 7th to 10th graders (ages 12—advanced, 13-15) and is the indispensable tool for Brave Writer parents who want to teach language arts in a natural, literature-bathed context.


DEEP DIVE into Jane Austen’s World

The Preciousness of Life

The Preciousness of Life

This August we’re reading Station Eleven in our Boomerang Book Club (the book club for teens). Written by a Canadian homeschooler (Emily St. John Mandel), it was a national book award finalist.

The story is about a post-pandemic world where not enough people survive to sustain life as we currently know it—no one to ship our goods across oceans, no one to run the power grid, no one to drill for oil and turn it into petroleum, no more harvesting of crops, no running water, and so on… The modern world grinds to a halt. The remnant population is forced to hunt and scavenge in the ruins of the 21st century.

I read this book last August, in fact. It so moved me, I wept openly on a plane, amazed at the miracle of flight—that I had been born in a time and place where transcontinental travel was taken for granted, that even my tray and cupholder were perfectly designed and formed: a delight to use. A miracle!

All year, I’ve lived with that feeling—that we have lost touch with just how incredible it is to be alive now, in this moment aware of all the moments that came before and able to take full advantage of all that we offer each other now.

It’s taken all ten thousand years and billions of human beings to create every single taken-for-granted item and service we live with daily—to be at a point where travel, telecommunications, and agriculture make life on our planet comfortable, productive, and stupendously amazing!

The overnight news of rising tensions between the US and North Korea (I’ll admit) freaked me out. I’m amped on adrenaline and the old 1970s fear of nuclear holocaust (only so much more aware of what that really means) has returned with a vicious vengeance. I found myself wishing I were already dead—I don’t want to be alive when nuclear holocaust comes. Honestly.

It struck me as prescient really that we are reading this book about a kind of post-apocalyptic world as a community this month.

It’s an illusion to think that tomorrow and tomorrow and tomorrow will be here waiting to be enjoyed or faced.

The luxury of the illusion of time allows us to be cranky, to be careless with our attitudes and words, to assume that an opulence of time allows us to mistreat one another knowing we can make up for it whenever we want to—some other day we can be kind, understanding, gentle, tender. Today, we’ll be moody, irritable, annoyed.

Yet today is a miracle—that you and I are still here, still sipping coffee, listening to music written by someone we’ll never meet, piped to us by machines the size of a pocket in a pair of jeans fueled by energy whose source is every bit as mysterious as a witch doctor’s incantation.

I’m typing my thoughts and they will instantly transmit to every corner of the globe through no effort of mine.

All of this astonishing achievement can be snatched from us in a moment—a careless, angry, ego-laden move by a national leader designed to protect one set of interests against another.

The real danger of our interconnected, startlingly brilliant 21st century world IS our interdependence—the collective need to collaborate rather than compete. Our nationality, our ethnicity, our geography hold us hostage. “Survival of the fittest” no longer works. To make it, we must partner and care about each other’s welfare as we do our own.

It starts at home. Today.

No more going nuclear on our kids, on our spouses.

No more permitting them to go nuclear on us.

It feels like we don’t have time to be cruel. I remember a friend saying years ago when faced with awfulness, to respond in the opposite spirit. It occurred to me tonight that in light of the international tension, we can flip the script at home.

It’s time to take time in hand and hold it gently, with reverence, sharing love with those we love, being kind and considerate. There’s no time to waste. This is it.

Be Good to You: Self Care Practices for the Homeschooling Parent

2017 Fall Class Registration is OPEN

Registration is OPEN for Brave Writer Online Classes

Brave Writer Online Classes provide a safe space for writing risks.

Fall Class Registration is OPEN

Today is our biggest online class registration event of the year. Our Arrow and Boomerang Book Clubs are open for registration as well. Spots fill quickly so don’t wait to sign up!

New to our online class registration day? I’ve got tips for you!

You will receive two email confirmations (one of payment and one showing your classes)

Charter School payments are collected later. Select “charter school” at the payment window to complete your registration. You will receive ONE receipt.

We’ve created an FAQ you can read too.

If you get stuck, contact us:

  • Use the live chat box on the website
  • Or email us at help@bravewriter.com (Put a clear subject line: “Payment didn’t go through” or “I can’t get past the ‘add a child’ page”)
  • We’ll get back to you as quickly as possible!

Register for Fall Writing Classes HERE

The Winners of our Big Book Giveaway!

2017-18 Big Book Winners

We wanted you to have the books to go with your Arrow or Boomerang purchase so we held a BIG BOOK GIVEAWAY for the 2017-18 book collections!

Here are the 5 lucky winners:

  • Betsy Frodermann
  • Deanna Niles McConnell
  • Emily Anderson
  • Sandy Foutz
  • Vincent Casey Lee

Congratulations! You’ll be contacted soon and your set of Arrow or Boomerang titles (your pick!) will be on its way (international winners will receive a $100 Amazon gift card to buy the books).

2017-18 Arrow and Boomerang Books

The Arrow (3rd-6th) and the Boomerang (7th-10th) are Brave Writer’s language arts tools (digital magazines) that teach

  • grammar,
  • spelling,
  • punctuation,
  • and literary elements using living literature (a la Charlotte Mason)

They include

  • four passages for copywork and dictation,
  • parent-friendly notes to help you teach the mechanics of writing,
  • nine discussion questions,
  • and a sheet of themed-party suggestions.

Each issue publishes on the 1st of the month and will be available for download from a private folder on our Brave Writer Website.

One caveat: We are offering Arrow and Boomerang book clubs for ALL 20 titles (registration opens in July). If you decide you want your kids to be in our book discussion clubs, know that the issues of the Arrow and Boomerang are included for the price of the club.